Sunday, February 8, 2015

Family Group #5

Jeanne Bornfeld is the co-administrator for the Hawkins DNA FG#5.  She shared her family information with me today and gave me permission to post it on the blog site.  FG #5 is a very large group.  Go to the Hawkins DNA site for more information about other participants in this group:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hawkinsdnaproject/

Here is Jeanne's Hawkins line information:

John Hawkins, Mariner of New England, was probably born about 1600. From quotes of his statements given by an indentured woman, Elizabeth Frame, his choice of words and placement of them in his statements, make him sound Scot.  He is said to have been one of the first Quakers on North American soil.

He is found first in Massachusetts.  He immigrated into Maryland in 1651 from New England, as stated in immigration records (Gus Skordas). He died by 17 March 1675. His will was written 3 February 1670 at the home of William Richardson in Anne Arundell County, Maryland. At the time Wiliam Richardson, John Hawkins, Mariner of New England, and his witnesses, John Teage, Jr., Thomas Hooker, Joshua Shaller - were all Quakers. They all signed their names on the will, including the testator, John Hawkins.

The above information is from original documents.

A time line for John Hawkins, Mariner of New England, as he always identifies himself:
b ca 1600
1630-1632 - He is listed in Boston, No. 41, in the List of Church Members. At this time "we" were a church-state.)
1651 - He transported himself into the Province of Maryland
1653 - He assigned his rights to Giles Blake of 100 acres, confirmed 2 May 1653. On May 1653, Robert Burle, clerk stated that John Hawkins of New England, Mariner, transported himself to the Colony in 1651 and assigned his 100 acres to Giles Blake, by his attorney Nicholas Wyatt. (Nicholas Wyatt was a Quaker who had probably come to America to escape persecution. At a court in Lower Norfolk County VA in 1646, William Howell said he heard William Julian's man, Nicholas Wyatt, say that after Henry Marriott was free, he had three years to serve. Liber B f. 14, Portsmouth VA Court House. In 1653, he was attorney for John Hawkins, to whom an assignment of land had been given, which assignment had been lost. "I, Nicholas Wyatt, attorney for John Hawkins, renew the rights, 2 May 1653". Early Settlers, Liber A. B. H. f. 316, Annapolis, Maryland. Refusing to take Oath of Fidelity, Nicholas Wyatt was deprived of the right to sell land.) Maryland State Archives copy in Volume 2of "Once a Hoosier".
1657 - Early in the year he was in Manadose, Indonesia, per deposition of indentured servant.
1657 - December, deposition states John Hawkins, Mariner of New England was at the house of Rice Jones in Rappahannock, VA.
1658 - Litigation in Provincial Court in Maryland in Anne Arundel County, concerning indentured servant, Elizabeth Frame.
1658 - Planter's Delight, 600 acres was surveyed the 15th July 1658 for John Hawkins and Thomas Goldsmith on the west side of Chesepeake Bay respecting the mouth of the Sassafras River and now in the possession of the orphans of Coll. Wells.
1659- 100 acres surveyed 12 Nov 1659 for James Bonner on the north side of West River on the west side of Cedar creek. Possrs: 75 a John Hawkins, 75 a Samuel Galloway.
1659 - 1659 Cecilius Lord Baltimore grants to James Bonner, planter, 150 acres, 7 Feb 1659, a parcel called Great Bonnerston, north side of West River, north side of Cedar Creek, bounded by land now in possession of Jacob Duhattaway, on the north side by a swamp. On the back was assignment of the property by James Bonner to John Hawkins. Witnesses by Richard Talbot, Thomas Clarke. Patent and assignment recorded Nov 1661, John Hawkins, claimant of the land, requests the patent to be rerecorded. (Abstracts of Land Records of Anne Arundell County, MD.
1659 - Litigation concerning merchandise delivered to William Brenton in Rhode Island, who later became Governor.
1660 - Mary Hawkins arrived in Maryland
1663 - John Hawkins, AA Co.,states he assigns to William Coale, AA Co., a parcel of land already possessed by him named Great Bonnerston, north side of West River, north side of Cedar Creek. 150 acres, half of which is made over to William Coale. 11th day of April 1663. Witnessed by Obad Judkins, Francis Sandry. Copy of Original in "Once a Hoosier" Vol 2.
1663 - Daniel Jennifer made over to John Hawkins of New England Mariner...26 rights of land 8 Dec 1663
1663 - wrote down the last will of Richard Grimes while at sea approaching Manhattan, New York - from Provincial Maryland records.
1664 - Litigation in St. Mary's County, MD.
1665 - Litigation in St. Mary"s County, Maryland concerning his "barke" and freight with Raymond Stapleton on Long Island, New York.
1667- Pole Almanack neck surveyed 100 acres on 26 Oct 1667 for William Davis on the south side of of the Patapsco River belongs to the heirs of Rigby...
1667 - John Hawkins, Mariner, possessed Boleal Monack, which was later sold by his son, John Hawkins, Planter.
1670 - John Hawkins wrote his will at the house of William Richardson, Quaker, "being intended for a voidg (sic) for New England" he was not certain how long he had to live.
1675 - is dead by March.
1676 - Inventory of his estate.
His ch: John, Matthew, Joseph, Anne, Thomas, Augustine

There were descendants of this man in northern Baltimore County, Garrison Forest, St. Thomas Parish. Baltimore County extended to the present PA state line and beyond, re. Susquehanna River location relevance. William Penn took some of the land granted to Lord Baltimore.


Two Rebecca Hawkins
Rebecca Emerson/Emson was alive and well and distributing her husband's estate as Rebecca Hawkins at the same time as Rebecca Hawkins,( d/o Matthew Hawkins, s/o of John Hawkins, Mariner of New England), was alive and well as Rebecca Gain, w/o William Gain; Rebecca Boring, as wife of James Boring; and Rebecca Frazier, wife of John Frazier, whom she outlived.

These two Rebeccas were contemporaries of each other, not the same person. Rebecca (Hawkins) Boring as the widow of James Boring was called into court to tell where she buried James Boring's body and brought along her son, Nathan to testify. He referred to James Boring as his father in law, meaning his father according to the law when he was the husband of his mother, Rebecca.

Rebecca Hawkins m William Gain on 1 Aug 1727 at St. Paul's, Baltimore Co MD. Ch: Elizabeth, b 13 Jan 1727; John, b 16 Sept 1730.
Rebecca Hawkins m James Boring on 5 Aug 1734;d by 15 April 1738 when adm Bond was posted by Rebecca, with Charles Green and John Green; est admn 18 Oct 1741 by Rebecca, now wife of John Frazier, est again adm on 17 mar 1742.
Rebecca Hawkins m John Frazier ca 1739.  Ch: Ruth, b ca 1740, m John Osborne; Elizabeth, b ca 1742, m ---Brown; John b ca 1744.

Rebecca Hawkins, daughter of Matthew Hawkins, was b 1704, and was the mother of Nathan Hawkins. Nathan's YDNA matches her male line. She was orphaned at a young age and the raising of her left to Matthew's brothers, Joseph and Thomas. Thomas demurred and Joseph raised her.

I have found no records that any one of this family owned slaves. John Hawkins, Mariner of New England, had indentured servants. Matthew Hawkins, his son, married the Parrish sisters, whose father Edward's family had indentured servants, also. This information is from original litigation records.


Jeanne Bornefeld

1 comment:

  1. My third cousin's DNA was recently classified as being part of this Group #5 which was exciting for all of us who are descendants of Matthew Hawkins Sr. of Culpeper Co. VA who died in 1820. His children by first wife Hannah Maxwell were sons: John (moved to Rowan Co. NC), James and Job and daughters: Phoebe, Mary, Elizabeth and Susanna. By his 2nd wife he had a daughter Rebecca. In his will he appoints his sons Job and James and his grandson Augustine as executors. Augustine was the son of James and is my great great grandfather.

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